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Diarrhea Planet @ 7th Street Entry

Nov 20, 2013

Q: WHAT HAS FOUR GUITAR PLAYERS AND IS PROBABLY LOUDER THAN A MY BLOODY VALENTINE SHOW WHEN CONTAINED IN THE 7TH STREET ENTRY? A: A BAND FROM NASHVILLE, TENNESEE CALLED DIARRHEA PLANET

Garnering a crowd for a show at the 7th Street Entry on a Sunday night while indie-rock legends Built to Spill are ripping up the main room next door is no easy task. Those who felt like going out to a late-night concert were probably feeling slightly nonchalant; the thought of the 8 a.m. alarm you would probably be waking up to on Monday morning probably deterred you from an eclectic evening with Nashville, Tennessee punk rockers Diarrhea Planet. Although if you had a low-key weekend or you just didn’t give a shit and you were thirsting to drink a beer, party hard, hear some ludicrously clashing riffs, bang your head, and probably get tinnitus, there was no question about where you were.

GENERAL B AND THE WIZ 

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If you arrived early enough to catch local soft rock act General B and the Wiz, you probably got wrapped up in their catchy hooks, bluesy riffs and jam sections that were reminiscent of work done by Neil Diamond and Jack Black. Their singer, who I assumed to be General B, was the star of the show; repping an open breasted shirt and a bushy moustache a la Burt Reynolds that blushed with masculinity. He enlivened the crowd with his words about love, life, and everyday relationships.

 THE LOVELY BAD THINGS

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Next up was the youthful, high-tempo, punk band The Lovely Bad Things, a group from Los Angeles who has released material via independent record label Burger Records. They lit up the stage (literally with a light bulb in their kick-drum) with eccentric high-gain riffs, fast drums, and conventional song structures, which were complimented by their male and female vocalists who collaborated in a sibling-like manner. The part of their set that surprised me the most was the number of times they changed roles. By the end, each one of them had played guitar, bass, and drums at some point or another, which is by no means a simple ordeal. Nevertheless, they were all highly dexterous in each of their roles and it added an extra element to their performance. Throughout the rest of their set they frequently expressed their love for D. Planet during their breaks in-between songs, which eventually led to D. Planet’s drummer Casey taking the stage to do vocals for them during one of their final songs.

DIARRHEA PLANET

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Anyhow, this was just wind and clouds for the storm that was about to come. As Diarrhea Planet set up their drums, bass cab, and four guitar amps, I could already feel the tinnitus haunting me, but I didn’t care, I knew that the hilarity would overwhelm my pain. If you’re not familiar with D. Planet and their music, I must note that they are pretty much the definition of fun. I had pretty high hopes for a ridiculous set and I have to say that I was not disappointed. The moment they hit the stage, ALL FUN BROKE LOOSE. There were laughs, there were jokes, and of course there were riffs upon riffs upon riffs upon riffs upon riffs upon riffs upon riffs. At any single moment during their set, there were always two solos being shredded out that were as dramatic as a Thursday afternoon soap opera, except their performance was actually good. They played an eclectic mix of material ranging from their earliest release Yamma-Uba to their recently released record I’m Rich Beyond Your Wildest Dreams.

They shredded for about forty-five minutes straight and then concluded with a longer rendition of their song "Ghost With a Boner," where they were joined on stage by The Lovely Bad Things which expanded their arsenal of guitars to seven. I can honestly say that it was louder than the “holocaust section” of My Bloody Valentine’s song "You Made Me Realise" when contained in the 7th Street Entry. When the distortion, noise, and “drinkin’ my beer and bitchin’” of "Ghost With a Boner" faded away, they played a final reprise of their most serious number "Skeleton Head" and took their leave.

Three days later, my ears are still ringing and I am still smiling. Thanks, D. Planet. 

Jaak Jensen