Now Playing
On Radio K

View Song Log »
Request a Song »

STREAM:    128k    256k

just_signals.png

STUDIO: 612-626-4770

grey_bar.jpg

WEEKLY RELEASE SPOTLIGHT


Young Widows
Easy Living

grey_bar.jpg

TRACK OF THE DAY


Flashlights
Don't Take Me Seriously
grey_bar.jpg

Apr 07, 2014

Say Yes To Love

Perfect Pussy

say_yes_to_love.jpg

Say Yes To Love
Captured Tracks

Since when do we say yes to love?

An explosion. Fireworks. Perfect Pussy.

The band from Syracuse with the name can be placed akin to other loud, sudden things. Their shows are short, their lyrics are cutting and true, their songs loud, bombastic, and unforgiving. And their debut release, Say Yes to Love, is the loudest, the most powerful, the strongest, and the most empowering punk record I have had the pleasure of listening to so far this year.

There is not a single quiet moment on this record. From the very first second of the very first track, you're greeted with the small whirring of a tape being inserted and playing. A guitar plays by itself before the whole band joins in. The lead female's vocals, Meredith Graves (a name fitting for the lead singer of a punk band), enters distorted and loud. She is yelling beautiful poetry, somewhat unintelligible over the miasma of sound around her. But just like that, the song's over. Like a shot to the gut, the whole of this record is filled to the brim with short songs, meant to get its point across and move on.

perfect_pussy.jpg

The second track, “Bells,” shows just how much Meredith has been buried by the rest of the music. The guitar and drums create barrier after barrier for her to have to fight her way out of, yelling and punching her way through. She shouts of betrayal of one's own feelings, “We can speak the words of women and angels/ But without real love, it’s just sad noise.” Her bursts of emotions and raw vocal inflections make the whole ordeal seem sadder and angrier.

“Work” takes a larger turn into the aggressive. There's a real sense of fury and frustration that comes along with relationships and adult life. “We make love and fall so/ And it doesn’t feel good/ It’s not magic, it’s work/ But it’s real and that’s cool.” The album as a whole seems to feature a lot of feminist themes, including body positivity, breakups, sex, and even male privilege.

It should be mentioned that although there five band members went into recording this album, each playing their own part in a standard punk band (except for the synths, those seem pretty out of place), there is a sixth instrument. Feedback plays a huge role in every track, filling every moment with sound that would otherwise be silent, making the piece as a whole feel seamless. It's this aspect of the album that makes it feel like one large track, all twenty three minutes of it.

The track with the titular lyric in it, “Interference Fits” is one big crescendo. It starts out slow enough for a punk song, but slowly, instruments drop in and out, bringing with it a louder and more passionate Graves. But right in the middle of the song, the first comprehensible words come out, without any kind of instrument behind it. Just Graves' voice, clear and concise, asking the big question. “Since when do we say yes to love?” Why do we open ourselves up to people? Why do we risk ourselves being hurt? If you've gone through a break-up, these lyrics resonate with pain and desperation. The songs leaps back to life, two overdubbed vocal tracks shouting as waves of sound form around them, like thoughts jumbling through an anxious mind, ending just as quickly as it begun.

perfect_pussy_2.jpg

The final track “VII” brings a kind of circle to the album, referencing to the very first group of songs they released, “I have lost all desire for feeling.” Only this self-reference seems a little strange, as the song on their newest record seems more akin to noise. It blends in with the penultimate song, only to drop out and the sound of the tape being played again greets the listener. Synthy feedback is heard, but only for so long. The tape keeps us company as the guitar makes a small cameo, only for more electronic, demonic beeps to come in, quietly at first, but soon, it's right in your face. They get noisier and noisier, like a storm, only to hear even Graves' voice recite poetry one more time. Feedback fades away and the tape is removed from the player.

The entirety of this album is short. Clocking in at only thirty minutes, every track is like a lap around a go-kart track, only each go-kart is strapped with explosives, and if you stop or slow down for any reason, you're history. I think that's where the beauty lies. The fact that their sets are nefariously short (as noted in Amanda Reeder's review of their show) mean that every experience is going to be what you get at first glance. There is no time to reflect. There is only time to enjoy what you're given and move on with your life with an excitement that only songs by Perfect Pussy can provide. Luckily for us, we're just a small push away from putting the tape back in.

Paul Benson

Interference Fits -