Now Playing
On Radio K

DJ: Social Distance
Animal Collective
Today's Supernatural

Centipede Hz
View Song Log »

STREAM: 128k 256k

770 AM, 100.7 and 104.5 FM

STUDIO: 612-626-4770

The Vanguard

WEEKLY RELEASE SPOTLIGHT


Wilson’s Prom
Welcome to the Prom
Metro Transit
Eastlake Craft Brewery
Franconia Sculpture Park

Twin Shadow

Oct 10, 2018

twinshadoww.jpg

Revamping once tired sounds was the theme of the Static Panic and Twin Shadow show at Fine Line.The small venue pulsated with energy  as fans trickled in at 8 while Static Panic consumed the stage. The band oozed charm between sets, flirting with excitement and sexily refurbishing old tired 80s sounds. The first song eased in with a spoken poetry verse followed by a vintage laced intro picking chords from cult classic Led Zeppelin. Horror was the vibe of the first song as Static Panic’s lead guitarist waltzed out adorned in a Dr. Frankenstein lab coat. The piece was reminiscent of songs  like “Feed my Frankenstein” by Alice Cooper.

These influences aren’t overdone though, and each song seemed to charmingly integrate some sound that evoked different genres of music from the 80s, whether it be the opening theme song of The Fresh Prince or Bowie’s “Golden Years.” Static Panic brought sinful high notes and an energy level that met the volume of the music, serving as a nice "appetizer" for the main event: Twin Shadows.

Slinking onto the stage like a rhinestone cowboy, George Lewis Jr. (Twin Shadow) captivated the crowd from the second his hat hit the spotlight. Suddenly the sparc venue was filled with fans hanging on every strut of Twin Shadow. Twin Shadow blends pop vocals with distinct underlying synth/electro base drives.

The singer’s deep semi raspy voice cooed between sets, flirting with the audience and drawing all visitors in with his sheer  charisma. The singer followed up his intro with “Saturdays” laden with beautifully intertwined harmonies and an overall composition that was reminiscent of an 80s montage scene. “Turn Me On” provided a provocative contrast to the precious fun summer song. Turn Me On with its erotic, almost pornographic intro is then cut through by metal guitar licks, and Twin Shadows proves they are a master of contrast, subtle intricacies, and songs that posses power to propell listeners through time.

Emma Chekroun